About Us   Contact Us   0.0.0
World Origin
 
 
 
 
Home V-Ray for Revit V-Ray for MODO V-Ray for SketchUp V-Ray for 3ds Max / Design V-Ray for Maya V-Ray for Rhino V-Ray for Cinema 4D V-Ray for NUKE Learn V-Ray
 
     

 Subscribe to our V-Ray News Feed

Categories Categories
V-Ray for Revit
(New)
V-Ray for MODO
V-Ray for SketchUp
V-Ray for 3ds Max
V-Ray for Maya
V-Ray for Rhino
V-Ray for Cinema 4D
V-Ray for NUKE
V-Ray for Blender
V-Ray Materials
Learn V-Ray

V-Ray Showcase
V-Ray Gallery
V-Ray Tutorials
V-Ray Manuals
V-Ray Artist Spotlight


Product Select Product Select
Universal V-Ray 3.0 Render Nodes
V-Ray for Revit
(New)
Free V-Ray for Revit Demo / Trial
V-Ray 3.4 for MODO
(New)
V-Ray 3.5 for 3ds Max
(New)
Free V-Ray for 3ds Max / Design Demo / Trial
V-Ray for 3ds Max / Design Academic University Bundle
Phoenix FD for 3ds Max
MultiScatter
AutoGrass for V-Ray
V-Ray 3.4 for Maya
(New)
Free V-Ray for Maya Demo / Trial
V-Ray for Maya Academic University Bundle
Phoenix FD for Maya
V-Ray 3 for SketchUp (Win)
Free V-Ray for SketchUp Demo / Trial (Win)
V-Ray 3 for SketchUp Mac OS X
Free V-Ray for SketchUp Demo / Trial (Mac OS X)
V-Ray for SketchUp EDU to Commercial Upgrade
V-Ray for SketchUp Academic University Bundle
Skatter for SketchUp
V-Ray 2.0 for Rhino
Free V-Ray for Rhino Demo / Trial
V-Ray for Rhino EDU to Commercial Upgrade
V-Ray 2.0 for Rhino Academic University Bundle
V-Ray 3.4 for C4D
(New)
PDPlayer


V-Ray Resources V-Ray Resources
Free V-Ray Demo
Free V-Ray Tools


Help Help
V-Ray Product Support
Contact us
Retrieve Account Information
Privacy statement
Terms & Conditions


Payment Options Payment Options
Visa Accepted
 
MasterCard Accepted
 
Discover/Novus Accepted
 
American Express Accepted
 
PayPal Accepted
 
Official PayPal Seal

VRay.com - Your source for all things VRay  ::  VRay for 3ds Max  ::  Tutorials  ::  Rendering an Interior Scene

VRay for 3ds Max Tutorials

VRay for 3ds Max Tutorials

Rendering an Interior Scene

Part I: Adjusting the GI settings
Part II: Rendering with materials
Part III: Rendering the final image
Part IV: Post-processing the image

Search Keywords: interior, lighting an interior

Note: The scene for this tutorial is provided by Wouter Wynen from Aversis (http://www.aversis.be/). For further discussion of this topic, see this topic on the V-Ray forum.

Part I: Adjusting the GI settings

Step 1. First render

1.1. Open the scene (which can be found here).

1.2. Assign V-Ray as the current renderer.

Since the default V-Ray settings are not very well suited for a fast initial preview, we'll make a few quick adjustments before the first render.

1.3. Check the Override mtl option in the Global switches rollout, click the button next to it and select a default VRayMtl material.

1.4. Set the Image sampler type to Fixed.

1.5. Set the resolution to 400 x 325.

1.6. Set the Region size in the System rollout to 32 x 32 pixels.

1.7. Optionally, you can turn on the Frame stamp to print the render time on the image.

1.8. Render the scene:

Step 2. GI preview

2.1. Turn GI on from the Indirect illumination rollout.

2.2. Select Light map as both the primary and secondary GI engine.

2.3. In the Light cache rollout, set the Subdivs to 500, since we want only a fast preview. We'll return this to 1000 for the final rendering.

2.4. Set the Interp. samples of the light map to 5 for a faster rendering.

2.4. Turn on the Show calc phase option for the light map.

2.5. Render:

The result is quite noisy, but it does give a good idea of what the scene lighting is like.

Step 3: Tweaks

3.1. Since the scene looks too dark, we would like to brighten it a bit. There are several ways to do this. One is to increase the power of the lights. However, this will make the directly lit areas of the image, like the patch of sunlight, too bright while indirectly lit regions will remain relatively dark. Here is an example of this (all lights are x 2):

You can see that the increased light power has made the image brighter, and also has increased the contrast of the lighting. The scene still looks dark though. We can increase the light power even further, but this will blow out the directly lit areas too much, and will slow down the GI calculations later on. So, instead of increasing light power, we will simply make the material brighter.

3.2. Go to the Material Edtior and put the default VRayMtl in one of the slots (it shows up as being used in the "Environment" in the Material/Maps browser).

3.3. Make the diffuse color of the material RGB (200,200,200).

3.4. Render

The result is much better. We still have the same amount of light entering the scene, but it is bounced around more and thus increases the overall brightness of the scene.

At this point, you can adjust the ratio, color etc of the lights, while getting a relatively fast feedback on the lighting.

Step 4. Better GI.

The GI settings that we used are good mostly for fast previews, while you are still adjusting the scene. Once you have settled on the parameters of the lights, it's time to refine the GI solution.

4.1. Set the primary GI engine to Irradiance map.

4.2. Select a Medium preset for the irradiance map.

4.3. Turn the Show calc phase option for the irradiance map on.

4.4. Render the scene.

Rendering takes more time now as V-Ray needs to calculate a more precise GI solution.

Step 5: Better antialiasing and less noise

The GI looks ok now, but we still have no antialiasing and there is noise from the area light at the window. We'll deal with those now.

5.1. Set the Image sampler type to Adaptive DMC.

5.2. Turn GI off.

5.3. Render

We do have antialiasing now, but the noise is even worse. We'll adjust the DMC sampler to improve that.

5.4. Set the Min. samples of the DMC sampler to 16 and the Noise threshold to 0.002.

5.5. Render.

The noise is less, but there is still some of it. Reducing the Noise threshold and increasing the Min. samples any more will not help. We simply need more samples for the area light. One way to do that is to go to the parameters of the VRayLight and increase the subdivs. However, if you have many lights in the scene, this is quite a lot of clicking. Instead, we will use the Global subdivs multiplier to do that.

5.6. Set the Global subdivs multiplier to 4.0 and render:

There is still some noise, but we can continue to increase the Global subdivs multiplier until the result is good enough; 16.0 seems to be a good value.

5.7. Set the Global subdivs multiplier to 16.0 and render:

Step 6. Final rendering with GI

The increased Global subdivs multiplier affects the irradiance map too, so if we render now with GI, it will be too slow. We'll need to do some adjustments.

6.1. Turn GI on.

6.2. Set the Hemispheric subdivs for the irradiance map to 8.0 to compensate for the increased Global subdivs multiplier.

6.3. Render

This completes the first part of the tutorial. In the next part, we'll add the scene materials.

Part II: Rendering with materials

Step 1. Rendering with materials

1.1. Turn the Override mtl option in the Global switches rollout off.

1.2. Turn on the reflection/refraction Max depth limit in the same rollout.

1.3. Turn GI off.

1.4. Set the Noise treshold of the DMC sampler to 0.005 for faster previews.

1.5. Render.

Step 2. Preview materials with GI on

2.1. Turn GI on.

2.2. For faster previews set the primary engine to Light cache .

2.3. Render

At this point you can adjust your scene materials while getting fast previews of how the will look in the scene.

Step 3. Better GI with the materials

3.1. Set the primary engine to Irradiance map.

3.2. Set the DMC Noise threshold to 0.002.

3.3. Set the light cache Subdivs to 1000.

3.4. Set the light cache Sample size to 0.03 (this will make the light cache a little smoother and slightly faster).

3.4. Render.

This is the final image that we will render at full res in the next part.

Part III: Rendering the final image

We now have to render the final image.

Step 1. Adjusting V-Ray for larger resolution

1.1. Set the resolution to 1600 x 1300.

1.2. Set the render region size to 64 x 64.

We will need to adjust the irradiance map parameters: since we increased the resolution twice, we can decrease the irradiance map Min and Max rate by 2.

1.3. Set the irradiance map preset to Custom.

1.4. Set irradiance map min rate to -5.

1.5. Set irradiance map max rate to -3.

Step 2. Rendering the final image.

2.1. Set the 3dsmax to save the rendered image. For increased precision, you can choose a 16-bit image format (for example, a 16-bit .png). Optionally, you can save to a .hdr image; in that case you need to select the Unclamped color channel in the V-Ray GBuffer rollout.

2.2. Press the Render button.

2.3. Go out for lunch.

The final scene for this rendering can be found here.

Part IV: Post-processing the image

The image looks ok, but in most cases you will want it to be a little darker or a little brighter etc. Instead of changing the lights and re-rendering, you can do those adjustments in an image processing program.

For example, here is the same image with the gamma value adjusted. I used a .png file and IrfanView for this purpose, but you can use any other software that you feel comfortable with - for example, HDRShop for .hdr files.

To add a more photographic feel to your image, you can apply some radial darkening of the corners, for example like this:


V-Ray 3.5 for 3ds Max

V-Ray 3.5 for 3ds Max Now Available

V-Ray 3.5 for 3ds Max is a complete lighting and shading solution that can be flawlessly integrated in every 3D artist and designer's workflow. The flagship rendering software has set the industry standard for speed, reliability, ease of use and render quality.




Learn V-Ray

Learn V-Ray

Learn V-Ray

Learn V-Ray





V-Ray Newsletter

V-Ray Newsletter
Renderings by Dennis Brunn

 
Subscribe to our V-Ray Newsletter

Subscribe to our V-Ray Newsletter and receive new V-Ray product announcements, special sales, tutorial updates and more!

Brought to you by Visual Dynamics LLC.


  Your email address is never shared and is always kept strictly confidential. Each newsletter that we send always has a single click unsubscribe link so that you can unsubscribe at any time if you decide that you wish to do so.


*  Your email address:
*  Enter the security code shown:


Your cart Your cart
View cart
Checkout
Wish list
Orders history


News News

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

V-Ray 3 for Rhino Now Available

V-Ray 3 is built to be the smartest and fastest renderer for Rhino. It's clean. It's simple. And it's now faster than ever to create great-looking renders right in Rhino.


V-Ray 3 for Rhino Now Available



Click here for more information




Your e-mail:

Type the characters you see in the picture. (If you do not see any picture here, please enable images in your web browser options and refresh this page):

Get a different code
Subscribe 


   


MultiScatter V-Ray Training

Learn V-Ray
 

Create photo-realistic renders and learn V-Ray like a real DSLR camera.

From the basics to advanced, the 5-Step Render Workflow (5SRW) V-Ray course provides 50 V-Ray lessons that include easy to follow videos, concepts and exercises.
 

V-Ray Online Training - Rendering by Heba Aboelenen
Rendering by Heba Aboelenen

V-Ray Online Training - Rendering by Monica Pelser
Rendering by Monica Pelser

V-Ray Online Training - Rendering by Ruben Barrera
Rendering by Ruben Barrera


The online course walks you through the following steps:

1: Framing
2: Light Balance
3: Materials
4: Final Render
5: Post Production
 

Click here for more information




V-Ray for Revit Now Available


VRay.com is a service of Visual Dynamics LLC Copyright 2016 VRay.com - Your source for all things V-Ray